How does a hike in interest rate effect the price of Gold?

I don’t really understand the connections between interest rates, Gold price movements and Currency rates. Can someone please explain?

If the US FED has increased interest rates then it will have a definite impact on gold prices. If the interest rate is hiked then investors will be receiving more interest by investing in US treasuries as they are also AAA rated and backed by US government. As gold is always considered as safe heaven in turbulent times more than an investment type asset class with interest rate hike investors will move money out of gold and park in treasuries.So interest hike will lead to less demand for gold thus gold prices will be moving down.Theoritically this should also increase demand for US dollar as investors will be looking to invest in US treasuries as they offer higher yields compared to other central banks thus strengthening dollar.

Finally we can conclude under normal market conditions gold and interest rates are inversely related. This has been observed many times in the past but it is not guaranteed to hold in future if any structural changes occurred. One should give more importance to the reason for interest rate hike in first place, whether it is to contain inflation or a genuine normalisation of monetary policy.

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Higher interest rates shouldn’t hurt gold...

When the Fed raises its key interest rate, bonds and dividend-paying stocks typically pay higher rates as well. Because gold doesn’t pay income, higher rates increase the “opportunity cost” of owning gold. Conventional wisdom says that higher rates are bad for gold.

But the data shows that conventional wisdom is wrong…

In July, HSBC’s Global Research team published research showing that the price of gold has increased after the last four Fed rate hikes.

History shows that gold prices also fall leading into a rate hike and generally rise, though sometimes with a lag, after the first rate hike… Investors are apt to unload gold in anticipation of tightening monetary policies. This negative pressure is sustained until the Fed announces a rate hike, which then eases the negative sentiment towards the yellow-metal. This explains the subsequent rallies in gold that occurred shortly after the Fed announced the first rate hike in the last four tightening cycles.

The chart below shows gold going up after the Fed started raising rates in 2004.


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When the economy is booming, companies make larger profits than when the economy is subdued. These profits are passed onto investors via dividends and this makes company stock a more attractive investment. Funds are attracted to the stock market by the higher returns. In order to compete for those funds, governments must offer higher yields on their bonds and banks must offer higher savings rates. Interest rates rise.

Conversely, in hard times interest rates fall. This is often done as a deliberate act of government policy in order to stimulate consumption and/or investment to try and revive a flagging economy. Yields on bonds, savings accounts and company stocks will typically be lower, and the risk of default on those investments may also be higher. Inflation of the currency denominating the investment could easily result in negative real returns, even in the absence of a default.

Gold is a store of wealth. It doesn’t generate any returns on that wealth other than that which arises due to capital gains and investors buy gold only because other investments are not attractive. When confidence in the economy is low companies are more likely to go bust, thereby wiping out the value of their stock entirely. In these circumstances investors turn to gold because it is seen as a safe haven. Although the price of gold can go down as well as up, its value is unlikely to fall to zero.

As the demand for gold from investors is therefore likely to be higher in recessions than in booms, the price of gold is often observed to be negatively correlated with interest rates.

As a bottom line, when the opportunity cost of holding goes up, it causes investors to be less inclined to hold it, and
the currency would tend to strengthen w.r.t. other currencies, which causes the price to gold in that currency to fall

The Effect of Fed Fund Rate Hikes on Gold & Currency

While popular opinion is that interest rate hikes have a bearish effect on gold prices , the effect that an interest rate increase has on gold, if any, is unknown, since there is actually little solid correlation between interest rates and gold prices. Rising interest rates may even have a bullish effect on gold prices.

Popular Belief About Interest Rates and Gold

As the Federal Reserve considers raising interest rates for the first time in several years, many investors believe that higher and rising interest rates will pressure gold prices downward. Many investors and market analysts believe that, as rising interest rates make bonds and other fixed income investments more attractive, money will flow into higher-yielding investments, such as bonds and money market funds, and out of gold, which offers no yield at all.

What Really Drives Gold Prices

The price of gold is ultimately not a function of interest rates. Like most basic commodities, it is a function of supply and demand in the long run. Between the two, demand is the stronger component. The level of gold supply only changes slowly, since it takes 10 years or more for a discovered gold deposit to be converted into a producing mine. Rising and higher interest rates may in fact be bullish for gold prices, simply because they are typically bearish for stocks.

It is the stock market rather than the gold market that typically suffers the largest outflow of investment capital when rising interest rates make fixed income investments more attractive. Rising interest rates nearly always lead investors to re-balance their investment portfolios more in favor of bonds and less in favor of stocks. Higher bond yields also tend to make investors less willing to buy into stocks that may have significantly overvalued multiples. Higher interest rates mean increased financing expenses for companies, an expense that usually has a direct negative impact on net profit margins. That fact only makes it more likely that rising rates will result in de-valuations of stocks.

With stock indexes at or near all-time highs, the stock market is definitely vulnerable to a significant downside correction. Whenever the stock market declines significantly, one of the first alternative investments that investors consider transferring money into is gold.

The Bottom Line

The interest rate, commonly bandied about by the media, has a wide and varied impact upon the economy. When it is raised, the general effect is a lessening of the amount of money in circulation, which works to keep inflation low. It also makes borrowing money more expensive, which affects how consumers and businesses spend their money; this increases expenses for companies, lowering earnings somewhat for those with debt to pay. Finally, it tends to make the stock market a slightly less attractive place to investment.

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Interest rates influence exchange rates because they directly affect the supply and demand of a currency. Volatility in interest rates affects currency values in a directly proportionate manner. Higher interest rates provide lenders a higher return relative to other nations; higher returns attract foreign investment, which increases demand and causes the exchange rate to rise. 

The central bank exerts influence over exchange rates by setting interest rates and subsequently controlling monetary policy. 

Exchange rates are relative because they are a comparison of the currencies of two countries. Several factors determine exchange rates, but all are related to the economies and trading relationship between the two countries. Interest rates provide a scale for the cost of borrowing or the gain from lending.

Generally, Investment in gold doesn't give the investor any returns in fixed terms(excluding Gold Bonds which has 2.75% p.a.) however, when interest rates go up the price of gold goes down. 

Conclusion : Interest rate goes up, gold price will go down but currency value appreciates 

The interest rate and foreign exchange policy is also affecting the gold rate. You can get great opinion from essays. The stock exchange related matters, suggestions, ideas are possible. What are tools are affecting the gold rate are briefly explained in their essays.

As the interest rates rise, the market becomes attractive and currency appreciates. However, in case there is high inflation, even if the interest rates are high it may leads to the depreciation of currency.

For the Gold there is no significant evidence where we can say that there is relation between rising rates and falling gold prices or declining rates and rising gold prices, because gold prices peaked well in advance of the most severe decline in interest rates. 

In general Investors buy gold when they fear financial crisis. It is because gold has preserved wealth through economic depressions, stock market crashes. It’s the ultimate form of wealth insurance.

The price of gold is ultimately not a function of interest rates. Like most basic commodities, it is a function of supply and demand in the long run. Between the two, demand is the stronger component. The level of gold supply only changes slowly, since it takes 10 years or more for a discovered gold deposit to be converted into a producing mine. Rising and higher interest rates may in fact be bullish for gold prices, simply because they are typically bearish for stocks.

It is the stock market rather than the gold market that typically suffers the largest outflow of investment capital when rising interest rates make fixed income investments more attractive. Rising interest rates nearly always lead investors to rebalance their investment portfolios more in favor of bonds and less in favor of stocks.
 

Gold and interest rates are negatively related through inflation.

Interest rates have a positive relationship with inflation. Higher inflation will induce higher interest rate. Since, higher inflation also means that that the purchasing power of your money is eroded, people choose to put their wealth in the form of gold.

One of the primary drivers of the price of gold is the expectation of inflation. If inflation is high and people think it will remain high, they will buy gold. If inflation is low and people think it will become high, they will buy gold.

The only way I know of that interest rates and gold are related is that gold doesn’t pay interest or dividends, so the ability to invest your money at high interest rates makes holding gold less advantageous, while rock bottom interest rates like today make it more advantageous to hold gold.

Gold is also in demand as jewelry and a store of wealth (especially in China and India). So healthy economies there, or increased fear of problems, would increase demand for gold.

And finally, gold is a favorite store of value around the world during economic or government crises. When you don’t trust currencies, you buy gold.

Gold is a store of wealth. It doesn’t generate any returns on that wealth other than that which arises due to capital gains and investors buy gold only because other investments are not attractive. When confidence in the economy is low companies are more likely to go bust, thereby wiping out the value of their stock entirely. In these circumstances investors turn to gold because it is seen as a safe haven. Although the price of gold can go down as well as up, its value is unlikely to fall to zero.

As the demand for gold from investors is therefore likely to be higher in recessions than in booms, the price of gold is often observed to be negatively correlated with interest rates.

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There is a direct relationship between the gold, interest rates and Currency as its related to investment products. To understand it better we can illustrate with the following example.There is a relation between fuel price and bus or air fares. Whenever there is a decrease in fuel prices automatically the transportation becomes cheaper and vice versa.  

While popular opinion is that interest rate hikes have a bearish effect on gold prices , the effect that an interest rate increase has on gold, if any, is unknown since there is actually a little solid correlation between interest rates and gold prices. Rising interest rates may even have a bullish effect on gold prices.

Popular Belief About Interest Rates and Gold

As the Federal Reserve considers raising interest rates for the first time in years, many investors believe that higher and rising interest rates will pressure gold prices downward. Many investors and market analysts believe that, as rising interest rates make bonds and other fixed income investments more attractive, money will flow into higher-yielding investments, such as bonds and money market funds, and out of gold, which offers no yield at all.

The Historical Truth

Despite the widespread popular belief of a strong negative correlation between interest rates, currency prices and the price of gold , a long-term review of the respective paths and trends of interest rates and gold prices reveals that no such relationship actually exists. The correlation between interest rates and the price of gold over the past half century, from 1970 to 2015, has only been about 28%, which is considered to be not much of a significant correlation at all.

A study of the massive bull market in gold that occurred during the 1970s reveals that gold's run-up to its all-time high price of the 20th century happened right when interest rates were high and rapidly rising. Short-term interest rates, as reflected by one-year Treasury bills (T-bills), bottomed out at 3.5% in 1971. By 1980, that same interest rate had more than increased fourfold, rising as high as 16%. Over that same time span, the price of gold mushroomed from $50 an ounce to a previously unimaginable price of $850 an ounce. Overall during that time period, gold prices actually had a strong positive correlation with interest rates, rising right in concert with them.

A more detailed examination only supports the at least temporary positive correlation during that time period further. Gold made the initial part of its steep move up in 1973 and 1974, a time when the federal fund's rate was rising quickly. Gold prices fell off a bit in 1975 and 1976, right along with falling interest rates, only to begin soaring higher again in 1978 when interest rates began another sharp climb upward.

The protracted bear market in gold that followed, beginning in the 1980s, occurred during a time span when interest rates were steadily declining.

During the most recent bull market in gold in the 2000s, interest rates declined significantly overall as gold prices rose. However, there is still little evidence of a direct, sustained correlation between rising rates and falling gold prices or declining rates and rising gold prices, because gold prices peaked well in advance of the most severe decline in interest rates. While interest rates have been kept pressed to nearly zero, the price of gold has corrected downward. By the conventional market theory on gold and interest rates, gold prices should have continued to soar since the 2008 financial crisis. Also, even when the federal fund's rate climbed from 1 to 5% between 2004 and 2006, gold continued to advance, increasing in value an impressive 49%.

What Really Drives Gold Prices

The price of gold is ultimately not a function of interest rates. Like most basic commodities, it is a function of supply and demand in the long run. Between the two, demand is the stronger component. The level of gold supply only changes slowly, since it takes 10 years or more for a discovered gold deposit to be converted into a producing mine. Rising and higher interest rates may, in fact be bullish for gold prices, simply because they are typically bearish for stocks.

It is the stock market rather than the gold market that typically suffers the largest outflow of investment capital when rising interest rates make fixed-income investments more attractive. Rising interest rates nearly always lead investors to rebalance their investment portfolios more in favor of bonds and less in favor of stocks. Higher bond yields also tend to make investors less willing to buy into stocks that may have significantly overvalued multiples. Higher interest rates mean increased financing expenses for companies, an expense that usually has a direct negative impact on net profit margins. That fact only makes it more likely that rising rates will result in devaluations of stocks.

With stock indexes at or near all-time highs, the stock market is definitely vulnerable to a significant downside correction. Whenever the stock market declines significantly, one of the first alternative investments that investors consider transferring money into is gold. Gold prices increased by more than 150% during 1973 and 1974, at a time when interest rates were rising and the S&P 500 Index dropped by more than 40%.

Given the historical tendencies of the actual reactions of stock market prices and gold prices to interest rate increases, the likelihood is greater that stock prices will be negatively impacted by rising interest rates and that gold may in fact benefit as an alternative investment to equities.

When the Fed raises its key interest rate, bonds and dividend-paying stocks typically pay higher rates as well. Because gold doesn’t pay income, higher rates increase the “opportunity cost” of owning gold. Conventional wisdom says that higher rates are bad for gold.

But the data shows that conventional wisdom is wrong…

International Gold prices are denominated in US dollars. Therefore whenever the US dollar appreciates(depreciates), Gold becomes more expensive (cheap) for other countries including India.



This impacts the international price of Gold and other dollar-denominated commodities like crude oil and thus impacts every other country in the world, including India.

Source- Quora.com, Wikipedia

Generally Gold price movements are based on Demand and Supply factor. Many Investors are of opinion that Interest rate hike will
make Bonds and other fixed income more attractive which will result in to lower Gold demand and thus decline in Gold Prices. This might
be true for short term gold prices but looking at long term this may not be true. There are instances where Gold prices have gone up with hike in interest rates. So its completely dependent on Investors view point and Demand Supply which affects the Gold Price movements.

Actually in long run there is no correlation its just for some months there might be some correction and appreciation but actually its very negligible in long run.

The relation between an Interest rate hike and gold price is correlated because as when there is a rate hike investors believe that key interest rate, bonds and dividend-paying stocks typically pay higher rates then gold.Because gold doesn’t pay income, higher rates increase the “opportunity cost” of owning gold.But historically it is proven that when ever there is a rate hike 3 to 4 months before the rate hike there is a 6 to 10 percent correction in the gold prices but gold recovers immediately after a rate hike.

During the most recent bull market in gold in the 2000’s, interest rates declined significantly overall as gold prices rose. However, there is still little evidence of a direct, sustained correlation between rising rates and falling gold prices or declining rates and rising gold prices, because gold prices peaked well in advance of the most severe decline in interest rates. While interest rates have been kept pressed to nearly zero, the price of gold has corrected downward. By the conventional market theory on gold and interest rates, gold prices should have continued to soar since the 2008 Financial crisis Also, even when the federal funds rate climbed from 1 to 5% between 2004 and 2006, gold continued to advance, increasing in value an impressive 49%.